Graduates Take Top Spots In Supply Chain Paper Competition

Published on August 25, 2014

Bauer MBA Alumni Best Opponents from the U.S. and Mexico with Big Data Papers

Spring 2014 MBA graduates who studied supply chain management at the C. T. Bauer College of Business at the University of Houston bested students from the U.S. and Mexico to claim the top two graduate awards in a recent paper competition.

Jigyasa Purwar and Scott Ellis and Brian Miles won the annual APICS Terra Grande District Charles K. “Chuck” Nelson 2014 Student Paper Competition. Both winning papers focused on the area of big data in analytics. Students in the course Global Supply Chain Strategy have brought home top honors in the past three years.

MBA Candidate Jigyasa Purwar won first place in the recent APICS Terra Grande District Charles K. "Chuck" Nelson Student Paper Competition.

Jigyasa Purwar (MBA ’14) won first place in the recent APICS Terra Grande District Charles K. “Chuck” Nelson Student Paper Competition.

Purwar received first place among the graduate-level entries. In her paper, she addressed how big data analytics can help corporations be more efficient in supply chain efforts. She also found that there are benefits of those technologies, but companies are reluctant to adopt them.

“While the success stories are few, the amount of impact each of these stories have documented is immense,” Purwar said. “I felt that one of the reasons for this could be because there is not much research available on an implementation methodology for the same, which is where I decided to focus.”

MBA Candidates Scott Ellis and Brian Miles won second place in the recent APICS Terra Grande District Charles K. "Chuck" Nelson Student Paper Competition.

Scott Ellis (MBA ’14) and Brian Miles (MBA ’14) won second place in the recent APICS Terra Grande District Charles K. “Chuck” Nelson Student Paper Competition.

Ellis and Miles entered their co-authored paper and won second place. Titled Analytics Enabled Supply Chain, the paper explored and identified the best practices for a successful company and examined how companies employing analytics capabilities are more profitable and productive.

In their research, the students put into practice concepts taught in two Bauer classes by Clinical Assistant Professors Michael Murray and Gordon Smith, Miles said.

“His Enterprise Operations and Business Intelligence and Business Modeling for a Competitive Advantage classes introduced us to the importance of big data and how many companies are taking advantage of the abundance of data available,” Miles added. “The hands-on approach we took in those classes really showed us how to manipulate available data to drive results.”

They applied what they learned in the courses and others to form competitive research for their paper.

“The research required competency in supply chain processes, information systems and overall business strategy. Bauer courses certainly helped build the foundation for our research,” Ellis said.

By Ann Lynd